Street scene in Exermont. Beginning the night of September 30, 1918, the U.S. 1st Division advanced seven km down the Aire Valley in the face of German resistance, suffering 8,500 casualties. Photo taken while Exermont was still being shelled. (source: The Atlantic). Street scene in Exermont. Beginning the night of September 30, 1918, the U.S. 1st Division advanced seven km down the Aire Valley in the face of German resistance, suffering 8,500 casualties. Photo taken while Exermont was still being shelled. (source: The Atlantic).

Street scene in Exermont. Beginning the night of September 30, 1918, the U.S. 1st Division advanced seven km down the Aire Valley in the face of German resistance, suffering 8,500 casualties. Photo taken while Exermont was still being shelled. (source: The Atlantic).

Sergeant Stubby was the most decorated war dog of World War I and the only dog to be promoted to sergeant through combat. The Boston Bull Terrier started out as the mascot of the 102nd Infantry, 26th Yankee Division, and ended up becoming a full-fledged combat dog. Brought up to the front lines, he was injured in a gas attack early on, which gave him a sensitivity to gas that later allowed him to warn his soldiers of incoming gas attacks by running and barking. He helped find wounded soldiers, even captured a German spy who was trying to map allied trenches. Stubby was the first dog ever given rank in the United States Armed Forces, and was highly decorated for his participation in seventeen engagements, and being wounded twice. (Wikimedia Commons) (source: The Atlantic).

Mountains of shell cases on the roadside near the front lines, the contents of which had been fired into the German lines. (Tom Aitken/National Library of Scotland) (source: The Atlantic).

Western front, a group of captured Allied soldiers representing 8 nationalities: Anamite (Vietnamese), Tunisian, Senegalese, Sudanese, Russian, American, Portugese, and English. (National Archive/Official German Photograph of WWI) (source: The Atlantic).

Algerian soldiers in Europe during World War I. (Library of Congress) (source: The Atlantic).

A pigeon with a small camera attached. The trained birds were used experimentally by German citizen Julius Neubronner, before and during the war years, capturing aerial images when a timer mechanism clicked the shutter. (Deutsches Bundesarchiv) (source: The Atlantic).

Australian Camel Corps going into action at Sharia near Beersheba, in December of 1917. The Colonel and many of these men were killed an hour or so afterward. (Australian official photographs/State Library of New South Wales) (source: The Atlantic).

Three unidentified New Zealand servicemen riding camels during World War I, the Sphinx and a pyramid in the background. (James McAllister/National Library of New Zealand) (source: The Atlantic).

A military camp for Australian soldiers in Egypt, during WWI. (State Library of South Australia) (source: The Atlantic).

A German soldier holds the handset of a field telephone to his head, as two others hold a spool of wire, presumably unspooling it as they head into the field. (National Archives) (source: The Atlantic).

Indian soldiers who served during World War I in France. ca. 1915. (Library of Congress) (source: The Atlantic).

Algerian soldiers in Europe during World War I. (Library of Congress) (source: The Atlantic).

Members of New Zealand’s Maori Pioneer Battalion perform a haka for New Zealand’s Prime Minister William Massey and Deputy Prime Minister Sir Joseph Ward in Bois-de Warnimont, France, during World War I, on June 30, 1918. (Henry Armytage Sanders/National Library of New Zealand) (source: The Atlantic).

Belgian soldiers with their bicycles in Boulogne, France, 1914. Belgium asserted neutrality from the start of the conflict, but provided a route into France that the German army coveted, so Germany declared it would “treat her as an enemy”, if Belgium did not allow German troops free passage. (Bibliotheque nationale de France) (source: The Atlantic).

A dog belonging to a Mr. Dumas Realier, dressed as a German soldier, in 1915. (Bibliotheque nationale de France) (source: The Atlantic).